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Anesthesia Development in Pediatric Dentistry

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Anesthesia Development in Pediatric Dentistry

By |September 25th, 2017|0 Comments
  • Anesthesia Development in Pediatric Dentistry

Dental decay and periodontal conditions are increasingly becoming common occurrence conditions, particularly to the children. Consequently, the increase in the number of kids requiring dental attention has led to an upsurge for the need for ambulatory anesthesia.  A joint study showed that the low percentage of adverse effects of the anesthesia-based treatment is evidence to justify the safety and effectiveness of the treatment procedures.

The recent inception of the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry- a web-based database that will now track and record the demographics, outcomes and success rates, will now allow the researchers to examine the above statistics.  By leveraging on the previous ambulatory anesthesia cases, researchers can accurately provide secondary analysis that will delve deeper with regards to the outcomes of the dental procedures. The studies will offer robust clinical outcomes data that will go a long way in supporting the safety of the office-based dental anesthesia as conducted by dentist’s anesthesiologists in the treatment of the pediatric dental patients.

A joint study conducted by researchers from the Indiana University School of Dentistry and the Indiana School of Medicine in Indianapolis examines the outcomes of the dental procedures that involve ambulatory anesthesia. The data used for the research came was sourced from the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

Over the four year period, 2010-2014, that the data was collected and reviewed, the researchers were able to review 7,041 cases. The study was a comprehensive study as it featured kids ranging in age from 18 years old to under 6 years. Of the total children reviewed, those under 6 years of age were the majority, taking 84.6%, while those between age 7 and 12 took 11.5%, and age 13-18 took a mere 3.76%.

In all the 7041 cases that were reviewed, no cases resulted in fatal complications such as aspiration, cardiovascular complication, neurological events or even death. During the study, the researchers focused their attention on three main categories-all based on the adverse effects that result from the administration of anesthesia. The categories include the effects that occurred pre-discharge, post-discharge or any other adverse occurrence.

Also, the study also made some vital revelation; the likelihood of any adverse events occurring in a patient was partly determined by other prior medical conditions such as pulmonary disorders, obstructive sleep panacea, postoperative nausea and motion sickness. However, prior knowledge of the conditions allowed the dentist anesthesiologist to tailor the treatment plans to cater for the adverse effects.

From the researcher’s point of view, they concluded that the low percentage of the adverse effects of the anesthesia-based treatment is enough evidence to justify the safety and effectiveness of the treatment procedure. However, this would not have been possible without the information and support from the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

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